Wonderful, Splendid

Questions  

bakerstreetbabes:

double-zero-agent-alison:

Stills from Jeremy Paul’s “The Secret of Sherlock Holmes” West End stage production with Jeremy Brett and Edward Hardwicke, 1989

imagine the joy of experiencing this.

— 3 days ago with 571 notes
youngblackandvegan:

zombiekunoichi:

elizabitchtaylor:

They look like they’re in a heist movie with Rihanna as the tough-as-nails leader/master thief and Lupita as the genius computer hacker



!!!!! So here for this!

youngblackandvegan:

zombiekunoichi:

elizabitchtaylor:

They look like they’re in a heist movie with Rihanna as the tough-as-nails leader/master thief and Lupita as the genius computer hacker

!!!!! So here for this!

(Source: fuckyeahrihanna, via trungles)

— 3 days ago with 180372 notes

roidyraw:

As soon as I learned Nicki Minaj voiced Sugilite, I had to

(via geckozen)

— 3 days ago with 45783 notes

lisafer:

errandofmercy:

oh my god Emma

*crying massive buckets of mommy feels*

I needed this today. :)

(Source: damethompson, via theashleyclements)

— 3 days ago with 13253 notes

explore-blog:

Illustrator and graphic designer Ann Shen’s drawings of bad girls throughout history. (Though “badass” is more appropriate than “bad,” strictly scientifically speaking.)

For some substantiation on the badassery of the above, see Amelia Earhart on marriage, Ada Lovelace on science and spirituality, Nellie Bly’s groundbreaking journalistic feistiness, and Eleanor Roosevelt on happiness and conformity and her controversial love letters to Lorena Hickok.

— 3 days ago with 828 notes
maikevierkant:

Space Foxes (because space animals are fun).

maikevierkant:

Space Foxes (because space animals are fun).

(via halefullofbirthday)

— 3 days ago with 26204 notes

trungles:

Gonna invest in a saddle stapler and make you some ZINES.

— 1 week ago with 20 notes
heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public 
BGLH writes:
“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.
“WOW. Really?” I replied.
I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.
With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.
Read more here.

heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public

BGLH writes:

“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.

“WOW. Really?” I replied.

I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.

With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.

Read more here.

(via wocunited)

— 1 week ago with 6925 notes
"COMMERCIAL HIP-HOP IS DESIGNED FOR WHITE PEOPLE. WHITE PEOPLE ARE THE VAST, OVERWHELMING MAJORITY OF HIP-HOP’S CONSUMER BASE. … HIP-HOP MUST MEET WHITE PEOPLE’S DEMANDS IN ORDER TO BE FINANCIALLY VIABLE CONTENT FOR ADVERTISERS ON TV, RADIO AND THE INTERNET. HIP-HOP AS AN INDUSTRY SURVIVES ON WHITE PEOPLE’S MONEY. HIP-HOP AS A PRODUCT RELIES ON APPEALING TO THE WHIMS OF ITS PREDOMINANTLY WHITE FANBASE. COMMERCIALLY SUCCESSFUL HIP-HOP REFLECTS THE DESIRES AND TASTES OF WHITE PEOPLE. HIP-HOP IS ONE OF WHITE AMERICA’S FAVOURITE FORMS OF ESCAPE, WHERE YOU GET TO PROJECT AND LIVE OUT FANTASIES ABOUT SEX AND VIOLENCE THROUGH PEOPLE OF COLOUR."
— 1 week ago with 5132 notes

sirdef:

novaorchid:

#can you imagine if we left these 4 guys alone in the top floor of stark tower for like a month #or even just a week #SHIT WOULD GET DONE #we’d probably have interstellar travel in 3 days

i’m not a science expert. i’m not even a science novice. but that’s so interesting that these four would come up with interstellar travel when none of the 4 above are qualified as far as we know? reed richards in the mcu is just listed as a physicist, peter parker could only be linked with engineering + genetics, tony’s engineering, bruce banner is physicist in the 616 but i believe just radiology in the mcu.

know who IS an astrophysicist though?

know who has actually manipulated travel between realms? 

jane foster!

(Source: harrydresdens, via themarysue)

— 1 month ago with 137051 notes
theroguefeminist:

kingsgrave:

skolita:

shiraglassman:

jhameia:

kakapokitty:

kawaikunaii:

knockingghosts:

myartmoods:

The Hesitant Betrothed by Auguste Toulmouche (1866)

I have always adored this painting. Having the central female figure stare with awareness at her viewer is a very powerful move, and something not often given to women in paintings. It creates an engagement with the viewer, she sees you and she knows you are watching her. She is no longer an object in an image, she is a person.

You know she gon’ kill the man she has to marry

I like how everyone else is totally excited the women are congratulating her, the little girl is so into being a flower girl.
And she’s there in middle going “THIS IS SUCH BULLSHIT.”

"the hesitant betrothed" there is NOTHING HESITANT about that expression

Whoa. This is really dramatic and unexpected :)

The “Fuck This Shit” Betrothed

This is the ‘Isn’t It A Tragedy She Was Widowed So Young’ Betrothed, is what it is.

"the lesbian and her lovers plot a murder"

theroguefeminist:

kingsgrave:

skolita:

shiraglassman:

jhameia:

kakapokitty:

kawaikunaii:

knockingghosts:

myartmoods:

The Hesitant Betrothed by Auguste Toulmouche (1866)

I have always adored this painting. Having the central female figure stare with awareness at her viewer is a very powerful move, and something not often given to women in paintings. It creates an engagement with the viewer, she sees you and she knows you are watching her. She is no longer an object in an image, she is a person.

You know she gon’ kill the man she has to marry

I like how everyone else is totally excited the women are congratulating her, the little girl is so into being a flower girl.

And she’s there in middle going “THIS IS SUCH BULLSHIT.”

"the hesitant betrothed" there is NOTHING HESITANT about that expression

Whoa. This is really dramatic and unexpected :)
The “Fuck This Shit” Betrothed

This is the ‘Isn’t It A Tragedy She Was Widowed So Young’ Betrothed, is what it is.

"the lesbian and her lovers plot a murder"

(via themarysue)

— 1 month ago with 45337 notes